March Planting in Seattle: Garlic, Radishes, Shallots, Peas and Flowers


It’s March in Seattle, and the signs of new bird and plant life are everywhere. We’re excited to finally start planting the food we’ll be eating over the next few seasons! This month, we’re planting garlic, radishes, shallots, climbing peas, and lots of annual flowers. Come along with us as we plant our garden, and let us know what you’re planting, too.

Ready to Plant: Radishes, Peas, Shallots and Garlic

Ready to Plant: Radishes, Peas, Shallots and Garlic

Seattle Tilth has a great book called the Maritime Northwest Garden Guide, which is our go-to reference for vegetable gardening in Seattle. So, with the guide in hand, we spent a lovely morning under the tall glass roof at Sky Nursery, picking out seed packets for radishes, peas and flowers, as well as garlic and shallots to plant directly in the ground.

March Flower Planting: Alyssum, Bachelor's Buttons and More

March Flower Planting: Alyssum, Bachelor's Buttons and More

These annual flowers are all great for sowing in March. We sprinkled them in around various vegetable beds, as well as in some pots and out front in our flower bed. How pretty will these be in a few weeks!

Dr. Earth Vegetable Garden Mix, and Cedar Grove Compost

Dr. Earth Vegetable Garden Mix, and Cedar Grove Compost

Dr. Earth and Cedar Grove have never let us down, so we continue to use them to amend our vegetable beds.

Planning the Bed

Planning the Bed

We laid out the vegetables where we thought they should go, eyeballing instead of really measuring. It works for us!

Shallots in the Sun

Shallots in the Sun

Sunshine in Seattle makes us a bit giddy, especially in March, and yes, we had a lot of Vitamin D coursing through our veins, but you have to admit, shallots in the sun are pretty gorgeous.

Metal Feed Troughs Make Great Growing Containers

Metal Feed Troughs Make Great Growing Containers

We got these feed troughs a few years ago, and use them to grow vegetables on the upper patio. They help keep the soil warm, acting like big insulators for the tender little seeds. You can see our swiss chard is still going!

Tucked into Bed

Tucked into Bed

There’s something pleasing about hollowing out the troughs, and then placing your shallots and garlic in them with orderly precision.

A Nice Surface for the Peas to Climb

A Nice Surface for the Peas to Climb

As the peas grow up, this wire surface will be the perfect place for them to climb. And, this vegetable bed right off the kitchen means we can trot outside for a quick, easy, bountiful harvest.

Hilliard's - Our Official Post-Gardening Beer

Hilliard's - Our Official Post-Gardening Beer

After a day in the garden, it’s nice to sit with a good local beer, feeling the last rays of sun on your face, thinking about your upcoming harvest, and imagining what you’ll plant next month.

March's Vegetable Garden Plan

March's Vegetable Garden Plan

 

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About Seattle Foodshed

We live in the Pacific Northwest, where we're cultivating our urban garden and eating the fruits (and vegetables) of our labors.
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8 Responses to March Planting in Seattle: Garlic, Radishes, Shallots, Peas and Flowers

  1. m&m says:

    I’m excited to plant some seeds I picked up at the Just Food conference a couple weeks ago!

  2. Pingback: March Planting in Seattle: The Seeds Are Sprouting! | Seattle Foodshed

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